Category Archives: Current Shows

Computer Insider Show #2018-10

Today on Computer Insider, what is a Virtual Private Network and do you really need one? Well, for openers the answer is yes and no. They are a good idea, but for most things, it really doesn’t matter. A VPN allows you to disguise or if you prefer, to change you IP address. AN IP address identifies you and your computer on the internet. Let’s say for example, you wanted to subscribe to Netflix in the States, and you can’t because when you sign up, they tell you that you have to be in the states. What’s happened is that Netflix US looked at you IP address and saw that you are Canadian. By using a VPN, virtual private network, you can select where you want your IP address to be originating from, so that sites you visit will think that you’re in some other location. Think of it this way. You connect your computer to the VPN host. You select a city or country that you want others to think you in, and the VPN host will then assign you a new IP address moving forward during that session. This is a big help when it comes to downloading music, movies or software from, let’s just say, less reputable locations, blocking local authorities from knowing who you are or what your doing.

Thank you for joining is for this edition of Computer insider on 102.9 Whistle FM. The show is broadcast weekdays during the morning news at 6 and 9, as well as at 4:30 and 5:30 in the afternoon. You can reach us by email at bob@computerinsider.org. I’m Bob Pritchard.

Computer Insider Show #2018-9

Today on Computer Insider, a discussion about software. Since I got my very first desktop computer back in the late 1970s, I’ve had software to do the things I got the computer for. And from almost the beginning, there has been a constant pressure to upgrade my apps to the most current version. Is it worth it? Well, that depends. I break down my software into three categories, Mission critical, packages that I use  every day to do the things I feel are really important, things like word processing, spreadsheets, audio editing, VPN and so on. The second group of software is the fun stuff. Packages that make my using of the computer more interesting, like video editing, databases, browsers and so on, and the final group is stuff I wanted to play with, usually demos of something like photo editing, or networks analysis tools, products I really have no interest in owning, but wanted to play with for a bit. When it comes to keeping current, I’m pretty good with the first category. I always upgrade when the updates are free updates, but been a lot more selective when it requires money. It’s always good to be current, but sometimes it’s difficult to differentiate between when it’s necessary as compared to when it’s good for the software company.

Thank you for joining is for this edition of Computer insider on 102.9 Whistle FM. The show is broadcast weekdays during the morning news at 6 and 9, as well as at 4:30 and 5:30 in the afternoon. You can reach us by email at bob@computerinsider.org. I’m Bob Pritchard.

Computer Insider Show #2018-8

 

Today on Computer Insider, a discussion about copyrights, and the net outcome of protection. It seems that every company from the beginning of time has looked at ways to prevent people from copying their products and force consumers to pay for usage.  My first computer was a Commodore 8032 Pet. The software I was using needed a special chip to be plugged into the motherboard to make it operational. The net outcome? A huge upswing in the sale of e-prom burning equipment. Probably most of us remember Napster and the lawsuits that happened when they started sharing Music, and the net outcome? Today’s Bit-Torrent downloading sits. Guess that didn’t turn out the way the music industry though. Another scheme that went wrong happened at Lotus Development Corporation back in the early 90s. While I was doing a TV interview with Mitch Kapoor, Lotus founder and at the time CEO, I asked why they dropped their copy protection, where you had to insert an original disk into a drive to start the package. He responded that they did an analysis of costs, and determined that they were spending more money helping legitimate customers keep their software running that they were losing to piracy. Most of the time copy protection is for the benefit of the manufacturer to protect their profit margins than anything else. Reasonable pricing works.

Thank you for joining is for this edition of Computer insider on 102.9 Whistle FM. The show is broadcast weekdays during the morning news at 6 and 9, as well as at 4:30 and 5:30 in the afternoon. You can reach us by email at bob@computerinsider.org. I’m Bob Pritchard.

Computer Insider Show #2018-7

Today on Computer Insider, we’re going to talk about eBook readers. Judy got one for Christmas, and I had rather stupidly assumed that loading books would be as simple as copying files from one device to another. No so. As it turns out, the companies who sell the readers and also deeply involved in the selling of books, so they’ve set things up to be somewhat awkward in the loading of books onto the various devices. The eReader we purchased came equipped with Wi-Fi, so we though that this should be a no brainer. Making a long story short, after several day of connecting, examining directory structure, connecting to Wi-Fi networks, and so on, we gave up and called customer support, the source of all knowledge. As it turns out, moving books you already own to a new device raises the issue of digital rights and the pirating of books. As a solution, most of the companies have integrated their eReader with Adobe Digital Editions, a free software package that checks to make sure you actually have permission to read the book.  Once installed, the process of connecting and copying eBooks was a simple task. So if you’ve hit the brick wall of trying to install and use some piece of software, don’t be a coward, pick up the phone and call for help.

Thank you for joining is for this edition of Computer insider on 102.9 Whistle FM. The show is broadcast weekdays during the morning news at 6 and 9, as well as at 4:30 and 5:30 in the afternoon. You can reach us by email at bob@computerinsider.org. I’m Bob Pritchard.

Computer Insider Show #2018-6

Today on Computer Insider, we’re going to talk how to make sure that you’re getting the most from your Wi-Fi at home. For the vast majority of us, our Wi-Fi originates in the router that the cable company supplies when we order our internet service. Typically, the installers will look for an easily accessible location near where your cable comes into your home, called the debarkation point. Over the years, most of the installations in my house have been in the basement near the fuse panel. This is probably not the best location, as it’s a long way for the Wi-Fi to reach second flood bedrooms, and other important locations, like the front and back yards. When I moved here to stouffville, I had the cable company install the internet modem near the TV on the main floor. This greatly increased the signal strength in the master bedroom and back yard, but no so much the front yard. To resolve this problem, we purchased a third party high end router which has really increased both the reach of speed of our Wi-Fi at home. If you have areas that need to have a better signal, you can add in a Wi-Fi extender or, perhaps a better solution is to purchase a hydro adaptor which will let you move your network around the house using your power lines.

Thank you for joining is for this edition of Computer insider on 102.9 Whistle FM. The show is broadcast weekdays during the morning news at 6 and 9, as well as at 4:30 and 5:30 in the afternoon. You can reach us by email at bob@computerinsider.org. I’m Bob Pritchard.

Computer Insider Show #2018-1

Show #2018-1 Script

This is Computer insider on 102.9 Whistle FM, your daily look at the technology that is making our daily lives more productive and more enjoyable. We look at everything from tips on getting the most out of your smartphone, to cutting the cord, to smart homes and the impact of technology on cars and appliances. I’m Bob Pritchard

This is a rather auspicious day as this marks the first show of 2018, marking the start of our 32-year of producing technology shows. I launched the series back in 1986 on a now-defunct national news network called CKO here in Canada, and later grew to be broadcast on Rogers’s news stations across the country, Corus Radio, and nationally in the States on The Business News Network. Later I launched a television show that ran on CTV, and now here we are adding Stouffville to our long list of broadcast partners.

The fundamental goal of these shows is to help you find your way through the minefields and pitfalls of using the tools of today so that you can better understand the technology that you are probably using every day. When we first launched back in 1986, the challenges of the day were helping consumers understand that technology was for everyone and not the exclusive toy of a few backroom techies. That computers were a massively enabling tool that we all would adapt to. Today the challenge is that we have so much technology that we tend to underuse and overlook basic concepts that are not only making our lives more difficult but costing us hard cash as the companies who distribute the products and services we use, have a vested interest in keeping us in the technology dark. We’ll change all that by telling you the way it is, with current information and suggestions. Enjoy. It’s a fun ride.

Thank you for joining us for this edition of Computer insider on 102.9 Whistle FM. The show is broadcast weekdays during the morning news at 6 and 9, as well as at 4:30 and 5:30 in the afternoon. You can reach us by email at bob@computerinsider.org. I’m Bob Pritchard.

 

Business April 10, 2014

The price of oil edged slightly lower from a five-week high today after China reported weak monthly trade data and U.S. crude supplies rose substantially last week.

By early afternoon in Europe, benchmark crude for May delivery was down 24 cents to $103.36 US in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. Yesterday, the Nymex contract gained $1.04 to settle at $103.60 amid unrest in eastern Ukraine after adding more than $2 the day before. The last time it closed above $103 was on March 4.

Brent crude, a benchmark for international oil prices, was down 60 cents to $107.38 a barrel on the ICE Futures exchange in London.

Oil prices fell as Chinese trade numbers showed that exports contracted unexpectedly in March, shrinking by 6.6 percent from a year earlier while imports contracted 11.3 percent. Chinese imports of crude oil were also the lowest in five months, totaling 5.54 million barrels in March.

 

 

Crude prices also slipped following the report by the U.S. Energy Department’s Energy Information Administration that showed 4 million barrels were added to supplies last week. That compares to a rise of 2.5 million barrels predicted by analysts.

In other energy futures trading in New York:

— Wholesale gasoline lost 1.84 cents to $2.99 a gallon.

— Natural gas fell 2.9 cents to $4.557 per 1,000 cubic feet.

— Heating oil was down 0.89 cent at $2.9451 a gallon.

105.9 The Region News April 9, 2014

A 12-year Scarborough boy remains in serious condition after being hit by a car; the price od housing in York Region is on the rise and Harper turfs a Russian diplomat out of the country.

From the 105 – 9 The Region News Room, I’m Bob Pritchard.

 

A pre-teen remains in SickKids hospital with life-threatening injuries after being struck by a car in Scarborough yesterday on Danforth Road near St. Clair Avenue.

Witnesses say the boy got off a TTC bus and tried to cross the street when a silver Hyundai hit him.

Police say the distraught driver remained on scene. So far no charges have been laid.

Toronto Traffic Services has taken over the investigation.

 

Smouldering embers appear to be the cause of a fire in Brampton on the weekend that levelled a Ukrainian church.

Brampton fire officials have deemed the cause of the fire “accidental” and say foul play was not a factor.

Parish officials say they will rebuild St Elias the Prophet Church on Heritage Rd, just north of Bovaird Dr.

Warming weather is pushing a spring pickup in Canada’s residential real estate market, according to Royal LePag. They report that after a “remarkably drab winter” for real estate activity, the final month of the first quarter saw inventory increase noticeably as the industry saw what had been an underperforming spring market turn a corner in the final few weeks.

The company’s latest House Price Survey found that most regions showed healthy year-over-year price growth, with the average price of a home in Canada rising between 2.5 per cent and 5.4 per cent.

Prices here continued to rise in the first quarter thanks to “scarce” inventory. Detached bungalows rose 4.1 per and standard two-storey homes jumped 6.8 per cent, respectively. Standard condos rose 1.5 per cent to an average of $364,979.

 

Once again hope is running high after officials say that sounds similar to those emitted by aircraft’s black boxes have been detected in the southern Indian Ocean. If the pings can be better triangulated, a video equipped submersible sub will be deployed.

 

Toyota is recalling nearly 6.4-million vehicles globally for a variety of problems spanning nearly 30 models built between April 2004 through August 2013.

No injuries or crashes have been reported in relation to the recalls, but there have been two fires connected to a defective engine starter.

Twenty-seven Toyota models are being recalled, as well as two other vehicles.

 

Canada has ordered a Russian diplomat to leave this country, as Moscow stands accused of promoting further unrest in eastern Ukraine.

The expulsion comes a day after Canada accused Moscow of fostering pro-Russian activity in eastern Ukraine after its recent annexation of the Crimean Peninsula.

Pro-Russian activists have taken over government buildings in Donetsk and have declared their wish to secede from Ukraine. Activists have also taken control of government and media buildings there. Tens of thousands of Russian soldiers have been stationed to the region.

Oscar Pistorius is testifying for a third day at his murder trial. He returned to the witness stand after breaking down in sobs yesterday while describing the moments he said he realized he’d shot his girlfriend by mistake. Pistorius says he called for emergency help after he shot his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp, and then police began arriving.

(“…got sick.”) (SOURCE:ABC) (445a)

The prosecutor maintains the double-amputee runner killed Steenkamp after an argument.

 

The Harper Conservative government is looking for public input on the topic of letting airport security screeners break into checked luggage.

Currently, Canadian airport screeners cannot force open luggage to examine the contents if an X-ray flags a concern.

They must first contact the airline, which then tries to find the passenger.

Transport Canada is seeking feedback on a plan to give screeners the power to break a lock or seal off a suspect bag without tracking down passengers.

 

In an epic finale more than 70 years in the making, red-headed comic book character Archie Andrews will die trying to save a friend.

The shocking news was announced Tuesday by Archie Comics publisher Jon Goldwater.

Archie will reportedly die in the July edition of “Life with Archie,” which is a spinoff series that explores the character’s life after high school and college.

There are plans for one more edition after the accident

While #36 shows readers Archie’s final moments, #37 to show how the remaining members of the Riverdale gang — including Jughead, Betty and Veronica and Reggie — have honoured the legacy of their friend.

BusinessWise March 19: Price of Oil Down Slightly

The price of oil was down slightly Wednesday as energy markets waited for the latest figures on U.S. crude and fuel stockpiles.

Benchmark U.S. crude for April delivery was down 20 cents at $99.50 a barrel in overnight electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract gained $1.62 to $99.70 on Tuesday after strong U.S. factory data and an apparent easing in tensions over Ukraine.

Thursday is the last day of trading for the April contract.

Investors are awaiting fresh information on U.S. stockpiles of crude and refined products, which give a weekly indication about the strength of demand in the world’s biggest economy.

Statistics for the week ended March 14 are expected to show a rise of 2.6 million barrels in crude oil stocks and a decline of 1.6 million barrels in gasoline stocks, according to a survey of analysts by Platts, the energy information arm of McGraw-Hill Cos.

Brent crude, used to set prices for international varieties of crude, fell 2 cents to $106.77 a barrel on the ICE exchange in London.

In other energy futures trading on Nymex:

— Wholesale gasoline fell 0.5 cent to $2.89 a gallon.

— Heating oil gained 0.4 cent to $2.901 a gallon.

— Natural gas shed 0.7 cent to $4.449 per 1,000 cubic feet.

 

 

Business Report for March 18, 2014

The price of oil edged up today as strong U.S. factory output boosted the outlook for the world’s biggest economy.

Benchmark U.S. crude for April delivery was up 15 cents to $98.23 a barrel in overnight electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract fell 81 cents to $98.08 on Monday. Brent crude, used to set prices for international varieties of crude, gained 46 cents to $106.70 on the ICE exchange in London.

Data from the US Federal Reserve showed that U.S. factory output in February rose at its fastest clip in six months after disruptions from severe winter weather.

Oil prices were also impacted by the narrow scope of U.S and European Union sanctions against Russia for its intervention in Crimea.

The initial penalties, freezing the assets of Russian and Ukrainian officials linked to the unrest in Crimea or who support the region’s vote to secede from Ukraine, were accompanied by the warnings from President Barack Obama that more will follow if Russia does not stop interfering in Ukraine.

In other energy futures trading on Nymex:

— Wholesale gasoline inched up 0.8 cent to $2.881 a gallon.

— Heating oil gained 1.2 cents to $2.891 a gallon.

— Natural gas fell 3.1 cents to $4.505 per 1,000 cubic feet.